The UK Government Is Planning to Ban ‘Non-Conventional’ Online Porn

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By Kieran Corcoran | 4:11 am, November 24, 2016

The British Government is set to ban “non-conventional” sex acts from online porn sites in a massive new push to regulate the internet.

Parliament is due to be presented with a bill which will bring all websites available in the UK under the control of a powerful censorship organisation.

The new powers are due to censor content showing acts like female ejaculation, fisting, public sex and any spanking which leaves a mark.

Activists and anti-censorship bodies have opposed the move, often pointing out the strange situation whereby the acts are legal to perform, but not to display.

The moves to crack down on online porn come in the same package of legislation that will force adult sites to verify the age of visitors.

There is no definitive list of “non-conventional” activities which the new law would specifically ban – and permissible content would be decided on a case-by-case basis by the British Board of Film Classification in accordance with their guidelines.

But porn producers have been given to understand that activities mentioned above – like female ejaculation, fisting, etc. – will now be forbidden, and so are unlikely to waste time producing content which might not make the cut.

The BBFC already regulates TV and big-screen movies under the same rules, published here online.

The body would have its remit massively expanded by the new law to cover online material as well.

The legislation was quietly announced by the UK government over the weekend as part of an amendment to the Digital Economy Bill.

But it took until part-way through this week for activists to call foul on the proposals.

It is the latest step taken by the government to crack down on porn.

In 2014, an amendment to the Communication Act 2003 banned pornographers in the UK from producing any films showing the same collection of acts proscribed by the BBFC.

Though porn producers were gagged by the rules, it had less of an effect on consumers, who remained free to watch videos made outside of the UK, and on porn sites, who were free to keep hosting them.

The 2014 legislation sparked a mass face-sitting protest outside Parliament, but did not lead to any wider action.

Though MPs and supporters of increased regulation have called for the BBFC’s role to be expanded, many object to a government body existing to routinely censor films at all.

One film-maker protested against the board’s existence earlier this year by forcing them to sit through a pointless, ten-hour film which showed paint drying.

If they take on the gargantuan task of taming the world of online porn, they are likely to have to deal with much worse.

A spokesman for the Department of Culture Media and Sport, which is putting together the legislation, denied they were trying to “police the internet”.

Instead they said the bill is about bringing the internet into line with offline media, and protecting children.

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