ST JOHN'S, ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA - NOVEMBER 22:  Prince Harry arrives for the unveiling of the dedication to The Queen's Commonwealth Canopy and Arbour Day Fair at Queen Victoria Park Botanical Gardens on the third day of an official visit on November 22, 2016 in St John's, Antigua and Barbuda. Prince Harry's visit to The Caribbean marks the 35th Anniversary of Independence in Antigua and Barbuda and the 50th Anniversary of Independence in Barbados and Guyana.  (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

Prince Harry’s Under Attack From Left Wing Trolls And It’s Pathetic

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By Constance Watson | 5:37 am, November 23, 2016

The Twitterarti are at it again.

Just when they’d temporarily calmed down following Donald Trump’s election, they awoke from inside their republican cages to break into song, this time targeting Prince Harry.

The prince, fifth in line to the British throne, is on a two-week tour of the Caribbean where he is carrying out numerous public duties and acting as an ambassador for his country.

Yet Harry’s royal tour has been met with disdain and disgust by social media trolls: #NotMyPrince is trending on Twitter.

The birdbrains behind it have branded themselves an ‘anti-colonial welcoming committee,’ seeking to ‘break the bonds of empire.’

Listen up, Anti-Colonial Welcoming Committee. You’re going to have to try harder than that. The #NotMyPrince campaign is yet another example of (predominantly) young people, somewhat politicised but largely uninformed, trying to edit history by writing the bad parts out. And it’s not good enough. Because the whole point of history is that there were good people, and there were bad people, and there were wars and there was peace. And the interplay of all of the above has got us to where we are today.

‘#NotMyPrince while millions go hungry in the UK & disabled ppl face cuts this family of scroungers just received an additional £35million pa,’ tweeted one member of the public – widely missing the point that the campaign seeks to ‘resist colonisation of the mind,’ not moan about the royal family generally.

‘#PrinceHarry shouldnt [sic] have come 2 the Carribean without an apology in hand & #reparations in his pocket! #notmyprince #slavery #colonialism,’ tweeted another.

‘Prince Harry brings the combined mystique of whiteness, celebrity, power and wealth; in return he is greeted with the usual pomp and circumstance,’ scathes a post on #NotMyPrince’s Tumblr page.

It seems a crying shame that in a world in which we have ready access to information, so many people are still looking back rather than focussing on moving forward.

And this isn’t the first time in recent years that social media trolls have sought to rewrite history because they considered elements of it to be cruel, distasteful, or non-politically correct.

Last year’s #RhodesMustFall campaign sought to remove a statue of the 19th century businessman and politician Cecil Rhodes from an Oxford college on the grounds that he was a colonialist and that any reminder of him, be it visual or written, served to approve colonialist habits. Have you ever heard such nonsense?

These people are correct to abhor slavery and condemn all those who were involved in it. But let us not seek to change the past. The past is the past. It’s high time these trolls stopped looking back, and focussed on more current issues.

If they would like to write history, they should start with changing the future. Human beings are still being trafficked. But Britain is no longer a mammoth colonial power. The United Kingdom has long ceased to be the empire on which the sun never sets.

In case #NotMyPrince disciples haven’t noticed, Britain’s influence in the world is static at best.

And Prince Harry is just a man trying to grin through the boredom of the next two weeks without being accused of promoting archaic cruel colonial practices.

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