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People Who Can’t Find Sex Partners Should Be Classified as ‘Disabled,’ Says World Health Organization

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By Kyle Foley | 4:21 pm, October 20, 2016

Can’t find someone to have sex with? Well, that makes you “disabled.” At least, according to the World Health Organization.

In an effort to give every individual the “right to reproduce,” WHO is treating people who can’t get laid the same way they treat people with legitimate infertility issues. The idea behind the new “disability” diagnosis is to make it easier and cheaper for more people to use In Vitro Fertilization (IVF), particularly single people.

But it’s gotten mixed reviews, according to the Daily Express:

Gareth Johnson MP, former chair of the All Parliamentary Group on Infertility, whose own children were born thanks to fertility treatment, said: “I’m in general a supporter of IVF. But I’ve never regarded infertility as a disability or a disease but rather a medical matter.

“I’m the first to say you should have more availability of IVF to infertile couples but we need to ensure this whole subject retains credibility.

Another critic sees it as “absurd nonsense”:

Josephine Quintavalle, from Comment on Reproductive Ethics, added: “This absurd nonsense is not simply re-defining infertility but completely side-lining the biological process and significance of natural intercourse between a man and a woman.

“How long before babies are created and grown on request completely in the lab?”

David Adamson, the author of the new standards, sees it quite differently. He says it’s a great opportunity for single and gay people. “The definition of infertility is now written in such a way that it includes the rights of all individuals to have a family, and that includes single men, single women, gay men, gay women,” he said. “It puts a stake in the ground and says an individual’s got a right to reproduce whether or not they have a partner. It’s a big change.”

“It sets an international legal standard,” he adds.

But the new WHO guidelines are not binding on health officials.

Follow me on Twitter @KFoleyFL

 

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