Anthony Weiner Pleads Guilty to Sexting a 15-Year-Old, Will Register as Sex Offender

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By Emily Zanotti | 11:11 am, May 19, 2017

UPDATE, 2:15pm: Huma Abedin has filed for divorce from Anthony Weiner.

The document, which lists Abedin and Weiner “anonymous versus anonymous,” says the divorce is uncontested, which means Abedin and Weiner won’t fight over division of the assets or, it seems, custody of their 5-year-old son.

According to the New York Post, Abedin has requested the case be sealed by the court, so that the couple can have privacy in divorce proceedings.

UPDATE, 12:00pm: Anthony Weiner pled guilty to a single count of transmitting explicit content to a minor, in a New York Federal court Friday.

The former Congressmen wept during his statement to the court, claiming that he “has a sickness,” but that he does not have an excuse for his behavior. “I knew this was as morally wrong as it was unlawful,” he read from a prepared statement.

Weiner agreed to serve any jail term less than 27 months, and to register as a sex offender.

Prosecutors asked that the court sentence Weiner to between 21 and 27 months in prison, but Weiner won’t know his fate until a hearing on September 8th. Until then, he is out on his own recognizance, though he surrendered his phone and passport to authorities, and agreed not to leave New York.

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Former Congressman Anthony Weiner is expected to plead guilty Friday to charges that he transferred “obscene material to a minor” —a 15-year-old North Carolina girl he sent explicit photos and messages to on social media.

The plea deal will end a federal investigation that has been going on for months, following a story in the Daily Mail last January that revealed Weiner, who had been in trouble for sexting women before, was trading sexually charged messages with the young woman.

Weiner will appear in federal court in New York Friday to enter the plea deal, but may have to wait several weeks for sentencing.

Luckily for Weiner, federal agents were willing to accept a guilty plea on the single charge of “transmission,” which carries with it a jail sentence of zero to 15 years— meaning that Weiner could avoid jail time altogether.

He will, though, have to register as a federal sex offender for a minimum of 20 years. And his address and whereabouts (including workplace information, though submitting that, for Weiner, is voluntary), will be trackable via the federal sex offender database mobile app.

That should come in handy for Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin, Weiner’s estranged husband. Abedin has been saddled with babysitting sex addict Weiner to protect her boss, but wasn’t able to keep Weiner from sending pictures of his junk over the Internet, even during Hillary’s critical Presidential primary.

The pair will also likely face some tricky issues with parenting their young son, even if Weiner avoids jail altogether. Huma Abedin and Weiner reportedly have been trying to work things out and avoid a messy divorce.

The two won’t work out a custody agreement for the tot unless and until divorce papers are filed  and they meet in court, but it certainly won’t be favorable to the former Congressman. Federal sex offenders can’t be alone with children, and if Weiner and Abedin do finally get divorced, Weiner cannot seek custody of his son. He won’t even, by law, be able to have unsupervised visitation, even if Abedin wants him to.

And Huma will probably have no choice but to divorce Weiner if she wants to stay anywhere near Hillary Clinton; the former Democratic Presidential candidate simply won’t tolerate having the wife of a registered sex offender in her inner circle, and she can’t possibly have any love left for Weiner.

The federal investigation into Weiner’s sexting eventually turned up a laptop with classified information on it, material Clinton and Abedin exchanged during her time in the Obama Administration. That eventually led authorities to confiscate Abedin and Weiner’s personal electronics, which then led to former FBI director James Comey re-opening an investigation into Hillary Clinton’s misuse of private email just days before the November presidential election.

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