Mark Wahlberg BP Oil Spill Film in ‘Deep Water’ With Over 20,000 Angry Petitioners

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By Tom Teodorczuk | 4:52 pm, October 9, 2016

Deepwater Horizon, Hollywood’s account of the BP’s drilling rig disaster off Louisiana in 2010, has been a modest hit at the box office, grossing $38 million in ten days.

But a petition on Care2.com is also proving a hit with close to 25,000 people urging the filmmakers to donate some of the proceeds from the film for cleanup efforts in the Gulf of Mexico.

Though Deepwater Horizon, which stars Mark Wahlberg, Kurt Russell and Kate Hudson, goes in hard on BP, it’s not enough for Aaron Viles who created the petition. The petition, targeted against Wahlberg and the film’s director Peter Berg among others, reads: “Join us in telling the Deepwater Horizon filmmakers: Please direct some of the film’s proceeds to non-profit groups in the Gulf working to help people and the environment recover from BP’s damage.”

Somewhat cheekily, the petition then turns into an advert for The Rising, an anti-corporate movie documentary hit job examining the fossil fuel industry which focuses on the BP oil well blowout that killed 11 people and spilled 3 million barrels of crude into the Gulf of Mexico.

The petition continues: “The story of BP’s dispersant use and its health impacts is told in a documentary film also being released soon. The Rising seeks to tell the public about the legacy of BP’s chemical response to their drilling disaster, and warn against continued reliance on dispersant to “clean up” after oil spills.

“Join us in telling the Deepwater Horizon filmmakers: Please direct some of the film’s proceeds to non-profit groups in the Gulf working to help people and the environment recover from BP’s damage. In addition, please support The Rising with marketing and distribution and by urging theaters showing your film to show The Rising trailer.”

We’re guessing few of the protesters have seen the film or are aware of BP’s scathing response to the movie (the company responded about the film: “It is not an accurate portrayal of the events that led to the accident, our people, or the character of our company.”)

There is also the matter that even though the film has done OK commercially, with a budget of $118 million, Lionsgate- the studio releasing Deepwater Horizon– might well end up with zero profits to give back to “non-profit groups in the Gulf” even in the highly unlikely event that they wanted to.

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