University of Wisconsin-Madison Creates Program to Question Masculinity

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By Ian Miles Cheong | 4:30 pm, January 3, 2017

The University of Wisconsin-Madison, recently in the news for its controversial “Problem of Whiteness” class, is back at it again with a new program available to its students. This time, it’s one designed to shame men for their masculinity.

Called the “Men’s Project,” the non-credit program aims to counter what some progressives refer to as “toxic masculinity” by talking to men about their troubled gender. The program is intended to help participants counter the alleged harmful social norms of masculinity and empower them to promote “intersectionality”—or identity politics, in other words.

A description on the project’s Facebook page reads: “Men’s Project creates a space for critical self-reflection and dialogue about what it means to be a man and how masculinity impacts us and those around us.”

“The experience focuses on the examination of societal images, expectations, and messages around masculinity to empower men to better understand themselves, promote the advancement of gender equity, and raise consciousness in their communities,” it continues.

Sam Johnson, who works for the University Health Services and is one of the main sponsors of the program, says that men are underrepresented when it comes to medical and mental health services but overrepresented as the progenitors of violent acts.

“With this program, we want to find out why this is and how we can change that culture campus-wide to encourage healthier expressions of masculinities,” Johnson says.

Participants are expected to discuss topics like media and pop culture, vulnerability, sexuality, hook-up culture, alcohol, relationships, and violence.

“With this program, we want to find out why this is and how we can change that culture campus-wide to encourage healthier expressions of masculinities,” says the organizer.

It would help to define what a “healthy expression of masculinity” is, because this can mean anything if you go by the ever-changing rules of social justice, whose proponents chide men for sitting on trains with their legs spread or providing calm explanations. Clearly, manspreading and mansplaining are the biggest problems of our age.

The course is only open to “men-identified students,” meaning that special snowflakes need not apply, and that it “operates on a transformative model of social justice allyship.”

If they’re not special snowflakes yet, the course is certain to do a number on them.

Ian Miles Cheong is a journalist and outspoken game critic. You can reach him through social media at @stillgray on Twitter and on Facebook.

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